2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
    Apr 01, 2020  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Course Numbers

Courses numbered 100 are open to all students without prerequisites. Ordinarily, courses numbered 200, 300, and 400 have prerequisites and may not be taken by freshmen. Consult the individual department course listing for exceptions to this general policy.

Students are advised to check the course offerings before each advisement period.

The following courses may be offered during the 2018-2019 academic year—including Summer, Fall, Intersession, and/or Spring semesters/sessions/trimesters at both SJC Brooklyn and SJC Long Island, unless otherwise noted. Not all of these courses will be available at night or on weekends at SJC Brooklyn and SJC Long Island. Consult the semestral course offerings for more specific information, including the SJC Long Island Weekend College Trimester Program.

Online Courses: Academic departments offer courses in an online format. Check the semester course offerings for details.

 

 

Child Study

  
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    CS 414 - Supervised Student Teaching


    Observation and supervised practice teaching in the primary and elementary grades.  Placements arranged to meet the requirements of the Initial Early Childhood and Childhood Certificates in New York State. Lesson planning for content areas:  English Language Arts, Mathematics, Science and Social Studies.  Required attendance at weekly seminar. 

    For a student to be recommended for New York State Certification:  Grade of 2.8 or higher required.


    Prerequisite: Approval of Recommendations Committee.

    Student Teaching:  A minimum of 5 mornings and 3 afternoons per week for half a semester in Grade 1 or 2 and 5 mornings and 3 afternoons for half a semester in Grades 4-6. 
    2 seminar hours 1 semester 5 credits.
    Fall and Spring. Long Island Campus Only.

  
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    CS 423 - Special Education Student Teaching


    Observation and supervised student teaching in self-contained, special education classes or inclusive classes, arranged to meet the requirements of the initial certificates for Children With Disabilities: Early Childhood and Childhood. Opportunities are provided for reflection and demonstration of adaptive teaching procedures and the design of materials to meet special learning, behavioral and cultural needs. Required weekly seminars. (Grade of 2.8 or higher required for a student to be recommended for New York State Certification).

    Prerequisite: Approval of Recommendations Committee.
    One semester in a special class: 20 days in grades 1-2 and 20 days in grades 4-6 4 credits.
    Fall and Spring. Brooklyn Campus Only.
  
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    CS 424 - Special Education Student Teaching


    Observation and supervised student teaching in inclusive or self-contained classes, or resource rooms. Placements are arranged to meet the requirements of the Initial Certificates in Students With Disabilities: Early Childhood and Childhood. Opportunities are provided for reflection and demonstration of adaptive teaching procedures and the design of materials to meet special learning, behavioral and cultural needs. Required attendance at weekly seminar.   This course satisfies the core requirement for the SJC Learning Communities Integrated Learning Area.

    For a student to be recommended for New York State Certification: Grade of 2.8 or higher required.

    Prerequisite: 2.8 or higher in CS 414   Approval of Recommendations Committee.
     

    Student Teaching: A minimum of 5 mornings and 3 afternoons per week for half a semester in Grade 1 or 2 and 5 mornings and 3 afternoons for half a semester in Grades 4-6.
    2 seminar hours 1 semester 5 credits.
    Fall and Spring. Long Island Campus Only.


Computers in Business

  
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    BUS 140 - Microcomputer Applications I


    (COM 140 )

    This course is designed as an introductory course to provide the background necessary for the effective use of microcomputers. The emphasis is on the major applications of microcomputers: word processing, relational databases, spreadsheets and the use of the Internet. The course includes “hands-on” experience with common applications software. No previous computer related experience is necessary.

    Note: Students may not offer this course toward the fulfillment of the Math core.
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Fall and Spring
  
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    BUS 141 - Microcomputer Applications II


    (COM 141 )

    This course is intended for students from all disciplines. It will develop intermediate and advanced word-processing, spreadsheet and database techniques, including macros, report generation, database queries, importing and exporting files, address-books, labels, graphic, and table manipulation. It will also include expanded Internet and World Wide Web topics.

    Prerequisites: COM 140  or equivalent, or departmental approval.
    Note: Students may not offer this course toward the fulfillment of the Math core.
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Fall and Spring

Communication Studies

CO-CURRICULAR WORKSHOP IN DRAMATICS may be offered for academic credit in accordance with the policy that students may earn 1/2 academic credit per semester for a total of two credits toward the degree for participation in co-curricular activities approved for credit by the faculty. Consult the Moderator and Director of Chapel Players.

  
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    SPC 102 - Introduction to Human Communication


    Speech Communication

    A study of the speech communication process-its basic theories and principles and their application in guided speech experiences, including public speaking and group discussion.

    1 semester 3 credits.
    Fall and Spring
  
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    SPC 112 - Introduction To Sign Language


    Introduction to basic sign language with emphasis on the development of expressive and receptive signing skills. Exploration of the fundamentals of deaf culture, American Sign Language, and the models of communication used by deaf persons.

    1 semester 3 credits.
    Fall and Spring SJC Long Island. Fall only SJC Brooklyn
  
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    SPC 115 - Voice and Diction


    Designed for the acquisition of improved pronunciation and articulation. Correct inflection patterns, semantic choices, and vocal projection are studied and practiced.

    1 semester 3 credits.
    Fall and Spring
  
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    SPC 130 - Introduction to the Theatre


    A study of the origins of theatre; an examination of the elements of theatre and it relationship to life; student participation in theatre experiences.

    1 semester 3 credits.
    Fall and Spring SJC Long Island. On Demand SJC Brooklyn.
  
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    SPC 132 - Fundamentals of Acting


    This course incorporates theories, techniques and practices of acting. It is a study of the philosophy of acting that integrates the expression of the body, voice, imagination, external stimuli and script analysis. It is based on theories, systems and methods of acting as put forth by Stanislavski, Adler and others.

    1 semester 3 credits.
    Fall and Spring. SJC Long Island Only.
  
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    SPC 204 - Interpersonal Communication


    A study of interpersonal communication dynamics; an examination of communication theory as it relates to various social and work situations; student participation in interpersonal experiences. Topics include self concept, language and non-verbal communication, assertiveness and stages of relationship development.

    Prerequisite: SPC 102  
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Fall and Spring SJC Long Island. Fall 2017 SJC Brooklyn
  
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    SPC 205 - Intercultural Communication


    An introduction to the sociological and psychological factors that influence communication among people of different cultures. Lectures and discussions will focus on developing an understanding of the all-too common barriers to effective communication found today in business, teaching, social work, government, etc.

    Prerequisite: SPC 102  
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Fall and Spring SJC Long Island
  
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    SPC 206 - Business and Professional Communication


    The study of speech communication in business, professional and community organizations. Group discussion, interviews, listening skills, problem solving leadership, and the planning of presentations and meetings are emphasized.

    Prerequisite: SPC 102  
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Fall and Spring SJC Long Island
  
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    SPC 207 - Public Speaking



     

    This course enables students to the practical skills necessary for effective public speaking. Students will develop and strengthen skills in preparing and presenting public oral presentations in a variety of situations.  Students will be provided a basic background in the theories and principles of public speaking, as well as practical experience with the basic types of speeches.

    1 semester 3 credits.
    For SJC Long Island Only. Fall and Spring.
  
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    SPC 208 - Listening Theories and Applications


    A study of the processes of listening: theories, components, and factors impacting its effectiveness. Special attention given to application of theory and the building of listening skills.

    Prerequisite: SPC 102 , not open to freshmen
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Fall and Spring SJC Long Island.
  
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    SPC 212 - Phonetics


    Detailed study of the phonemes of English; transcription of standard and non-standard pronunciation and dialects in the international Phonetic Alphabet.

    Prerequisite: SPC 102  and SPC 115  or departmental permission
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Fall and Spring
  
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    SPC 217 - Oral Interpretation of Literature


    The aim of the course is to stimulate the appreciation of literature through study and practice in the oral interpretation of poetry, narrative prose, and dramatic literature.

    Prerequisite: SPC 102 , not open to freshmen
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Fall and Spring SJC Long Island. Spring only SJC Brooklyn.
  
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    SPC 218 - Normal Language Development


    An intensive study of typical language development, theory and practice as advocated by leading researchers in the field.

    Prerequisite: SPC 102  
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Fall and Spring
  
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    SPC 220 - Sound and the Auditory Mechanism


    A study of the physics and acoustics of sound as related to human communication.

    Prerequisites:  SPC 218  
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Fall Only - SJC Brooklyn. Fall and Spring SJC Long Island.
  
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    SPC 222 - Nonverbal Communication


    The analysis and application of nonverbal cues and their effects on interpersonal and intercultural communication. Emphasis is on communication by means of body movement (kinesics), spatial relationships (proxemics), and vocal cues (paralanguage); by means of touch (haptics), physical appearance and dress, and physical behavior and communication through objects.

    Prerequisite: SPC 102  
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Fall and Spring. SJC Long Island Only. SJC Brooklyn on Demand.
  
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    SPC 224 - Children’s Literature and Oral Expression


    An appreciation of our rich heritage of children’s literature through exposure to noted stories, authors and illustrators (both historic and modern). Experiences in storytelling and creative interpretation of children’s literature through various media.

    Prerequisite: SPC 102 . Not open to Freshmen at SJC Long Island.
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Fall and Spring
  
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    SPC 225 - Psychology of Language


    An introduction to the psychological study of spoken language that examines the nature and origin of animal and human communication. A special emphasis on various psycholinguistic processes including thought, understanding, and speaking.

    Prerequisite: SPC 218  
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Fall and Spring SJC Long Island. Fall only SJC Brooklyn.
  
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    SPC 228 - Acting I


    A performance class that applies basic principles of Stanislavski technique to the study of acting as art and craft. Exercises in pantomime, improvisation, monologue, and scene work help to develop the actor’s physical and vocal instrument, as well as the imagination, concentration, and relaxation key to performance.

    May not be taken by students who have taken SPC 132 .
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Fall SJC Brooklyn.
  
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    SPC 229 - Acting II


    A performance class emphasizing advanced work in building a character through an application of Stanislavski’s principles of sensory awareness, emotional recall, and character study. Students achieve a thorough understanding of the text and sub-text of the comic and dramatic scenes they perform and also insure an informed, detailed, and polished performance by reading and analyzing the dramatic literature from which their scenes are drawn

    Prerequisite: SPC 228  or permission of the instructor.
    May not be taken by students who have taken SPC 230 .
    1 semester 3 credits.
    SJC Brooklyn only.
  
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    SPC 230 - Advanced Acting


    Advanced study in sensory awareness, sense memory and character study for the preparation of a role. Basic vocal and body techniques will be employed to explore the objectives and super objectives of characters. Theories of acting will be studied and put to practice in laboratory situations.

    Prerequisite: SPC 132  
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Fall and upon demand.
  
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    SPC 234 - Creative Drama Workshop


    Course will explore theories and techniques of creative drama and develop strategies for implementation using pantomime, improvisation, role-playing, puppetry, and storytelling. The student will spend one class hour a week working with children in a non-school, educational setting on campus. Includes methods of encouraging the creative process, materials to be used in children’s programs and techniques for adapting children’s literature for dramatization.

    Prerequisite: SPC 102  
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Spring. SJC Long Island Only.
  
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    SPC 235 - Play Production


    A study of the principles involved in the mechanical aspects of play production; practice in stage design and the business of house management.

    Prerequisite: SPC 102  
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Fall 2017 SJC Brooklyn. Fall and Spring SJC Long Island.
  
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    SPC 300 - Theories of Persuasion


    Students will develop and enhance their abilities to become more critical and responsible consumers of persuasive messages. Persuasive theories, strategies, and arguments that influence receivers are examined. The focus is on understanding, analyzing, and evaluating persuasion. What persuasive strategies/appeals are most and least effective in a particular situation and why? Also examines the application of theories in the contexts of political campaigns, advertising, marketing, and interpersonal communication.

    Prerequisite: SPC 102  and 12 credits in speech
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Fall. SJC Long Island Only.
  
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    SPC 302 - American Musical Theatre


    An exploration of this uniquely American genre of theatre including its roots in minstrelsy, vaudeville, comic burlesque, revue, and operetta, as well as the array of artists that have contributed to it.

     SPC 130  or permission from the department.
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Fall SJC Brooklyn
  
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    SPC 304 - Directing


    Advanced work in the process of directing a play. Effective playscript selection, play analysis and research, production conception, casting, rehearsal, and giving and receiving of criticism are studied and practiced. Students assemble and direct a play of their choice that is performed before a live audience.

    Prerequisite: SPC 235  or permission of instructor
    1 semester 3 credits.
    SJC Brooklyn Only Upon Demand.
  
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    SPC 319 - Speech-Language Pathology I


    A study of the causes and symptoms of speech and language disorders. Functional disorders are given special emphasis. Diagnostic and remedial techniques are explored.

    Prerequisite: SPC 218  
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Fall Only SJC Brooklyn. Fall and Spring SJC Long Island
  
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    SPC 320 - Speech-Language Pathology II


    An intensive study of major speech and hearing disorders. Organic speech pathologies emphasized. Diagnostic and remedial techniques are explored.

    Prerequisite: SPC 218  
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Spring only SJC Brooklyn. Fall and Spring SJC Long Island.
  
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    SPC 325 - Speech Science


    This course will introduce students to the physics and psychology of human speech perception and production.  Through examination of principles and current research, we will discuss the acoustics of the vocal tract, the glottal sound source, resonance, the suprasegmentals of speech, as well as the biomechanics of phonation, articulation, and resonation.  This course will also introduce students to speech production assessment through use of computer instrumentation.  Models of speech perception with a special emphasis on categorical perception will be discussed.  Lab/lecture format.

    SPC 218  
    1 semester 3 credits.
    For SJC Long Island Only. Fall and Spring.
  
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    SPC 340 - Audiology


    A study of the nature of hearing loss - its causes and prevention. Consideration of medical and surgical treatment, prosthetic devices, and educational provisions. Study of diagnostic and rehabilitative techniques. Laboratory requirements.

    Prerequisite: SPC 220  or departmental approval
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Spring only SJC Brooklyn. Fall and Spring SJC Long Island.
  
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    SPC 342 - Aural Rehabilitation


    Study of the basic principles of speech reading and auditory training within a comprehensive program. Methods, materials, and technology, and their application in the training of the persons with auditory and/or perceptual disabilities.

    Prerequisite: SPC 340  or departmental approval
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Fall and Spring SJC Long Island. Spring Only SJC Brooklyn.
  
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    SPC 350 - Advanced Speech Communication


    This course builds on the foundation provided in SPC 102 . Emphasis on enhanced delivery skills and more sophisticated analysis of audience and selected persuasive strategies; targeting of presentations to higher level concepts, as well as specialization and professional areas.

    Prerequisites: SPC 102  
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Fall and Spring SJC Long Island. Spring 2017 SJC Brooklyn.
  
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    SPC 360 - Small Group Discussion


    SPC 270

    Students will evaluate various group communication theories and practices that encourage rational and democratic decision-making through cooperative thinking. For students engaged in education, management, public relations and other problem-solving and decision-making situations.

    Prerequisite: SPC 102 , not open to freshmen
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Spring
  
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    SPC 370 - Special Topics in Communication


    This course will deal with communication issues, developments, or problems not covered in depth in the regular course offerings.  It will enable students to take advantage of faculty expertise in diverse areas which are an interest to both faculty and students.

    1 semester 3 credits.
    For SJC Long Island Only. Offered at department’s discretion.
  
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    SPC 400 - Internships


    An internship program will provide students with work experience in a professional setting. The work will complement academic studies while providing practical experience. The intern will work jointly with a supervisor from the work setting and a faculty member from the College. The student will spend eight hours per week in an appropriate work place which will provide typical professional experience. A journal, final paper and 100 hours in the professional setting are required.

    Prerequisites - Juniors or Seniors with a 2.75 cumulative index and the permission of the department. The student’s talents and aptitude will be taken into consideration.
    The course is an elective and may be taken only once.
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Fall and Spring. SJC Long Island.
  
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    SPC 401 - Internship in Communication Disorders


    Designed to complement academic studies while providing practical work experience in the field of communication disorders.  In consultation with a faculty member, the student will acquire an internship with a school, hospital, clinic or private practice that provides Speech-Language Pathology and/or Audiology services and a typical professional experience.  The student must have an approved workplace supervisor, must spend 100 hours in the professional setting, and may not accept remuneration.  A journal and academic paper/project are required.

    100 Hours in the Professional Setting. 3 credits.
    SJC Brooklyn.
  
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    SPC 402 - Internship in Theatre


    Designed to complement academic theatre studies while providing practical work experience in the performing arts industry.  In consultation with a faculty member, the student will acquire an internship with a theatre venue, a performing arts company, or a related agency that provides typical professional experience.  The student must have an approved workplace supervisor, must spend 100 hours in the professional setting, and may not accept remuneration.  A journal and academic paper/project are required.

    100 Hours in the Professional Setting. 3 credits.
    SJC Brooklyn.
  
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    SPC 403 - Internship in Communication Arts


    Designed to complement academic studies in the communication arts while providing practical work experience in an appropriate venue.  In consultation with a faculty member, the student will acquire an internship in an organization including but not limited to business, education, non-profit, marketing/public relations, media, or a related context that provides a professional experience.  The student must have an approved workplace supervisor, must spend 100 hours in the professional setting, and may not accept remuneration.  A journal and academic paper/project are required.

    100 Hours in the Professional Setting. 3 credits.
    SJC Brooklyn.
  
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    SPC 405 - History of Rhetoric


    Students conduct a historical survey of rhetorical theory from classical times to the present. Rhetorical artifacts examined will include political speeches, television programs, print advertisements, editorials, music, film and Internet sites.

    Prerequisite: 15 credits in speech communication
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Fall. SJC Long Island Only.
  
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    SPC 410 - Anatomy, Physiology, and Neurology of the Speech and Hearing Mechanism


    Study of the anatomy, physiology, and neurology of the vocal, speech and hearing apparatus, as well as an introduction to voice and speech science.

    Prerequisite: SPC 320  
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Fall and Spring SJC Long Island.
  
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    SPC 415 - Rhetoric and Popular Culture


    Exploration of rhetorical strategies, argumentative approaches and definitional techniques embedded in the texts of popular culture. Contrasting current theories of rhetorical analysis and cultural studies with those of classical periods, this course will familiarize students with the rhetorical world in which we live and will sharpen their critical skills as consumers of persuasive messages.

    Prerequisite: SPC 300  and SPC 405  
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Spring. SJC Long Island Only.
  
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    SPC 424 - Clinical Procedure and Practice


    Case discussions and demonstrations in diagnosis and remedial treatment. Twenty-five hours of clinical observation.

    Prerequisites: SPC 319 , SPC 320 , SPC 340  Juniors or Seniors only with a 2.75 cumulative index.
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Fall and Spring SJC Long Island. Spring Only SJC Brooklyn.

Computer Science

  
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    COM 115 - Exploring the Internet


    Discover how the Internet and the World Wide Web can be used to locate, access and retrieve information from international library resources and databases. This course includes historical background, network etiquette and ethics, as well as the skills for effectively and responsibly interacting with the Internet. Topics such as Web 2.0 tools, email, search engines, URLs, and the hypertext markup language (HTML) will be explored in a laboratory environment. The concepts will be applied to the design of a web page.

    Prerequisite: none
    1 semester 1 credit.
  
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    COM 125 - Foundations of Computer Programming Using Animation


    The course will introduce students to the fundamentals of computer programming. Students will learn how to use computers for problem solving by creating algorithms, coding solutions and testing and debugging programs. Visual programming languages (VPL) will be used to introduce topics such as objects and object oriented programming, methods, logic, control and data structures. Students will program an animated world and create games using sequential, conditional, and looping algorithms.

    3 credits.
  
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    COM 140 - Computer Applications I


    (BUS 140 ) Microcomputer Applications I

    This course is designed as an introductory course to provide the background necessary for the effective use of microcomputers. The emphasis is on the major applications of microcomputers: word processing, relational databases, spreadsheets, and the use of the Internet. The course includes “hands-on” experience with common applications software as well as an introduction to computer hardware. No previous computer related experience necessary.

    Course title and description amended as of
    1/27/2016

    Former title and description:

    Microcomputer Applications I

    This course is designed as an introductory course to provide the background necessary for the effective use of computers. The emphasis is on word processing, relational databases, spreadsheets and presentation preparation. The course includes “hands-on” experience with common applications software as well as an introduction to computer hardware. No previous computer related experience necessary.

    1 semester. 3 credits.
    Fall.

  
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    COM 141 - Computer Applications II


    (BUS 141 ) Microcomputer Applications II

    This course is intended for students from all disciplines. It will develop intermediate and advanced word-processing, spreadsheet and database techniques, including macros, report generation, database queries, importing and exporting files, address-books, labels, graphic, and table manipulation. It will also include expanded Internet and Worldwide Web topics.

    Course title and description amended as of
    1/27/2015

    Former Course title and description

    Microcomputer Applications II

    This course is intended for students from all disciplines. It will develop intermediate and advanced word-processing, presentation, spreadsheet and database techniques, including macros, report generation, database queries, importing and exporting files, address-books, labels, graphic, and table manipulation.

     

    Prerequisite: COM 140  or equivalent, or departmental approval.
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Spring

  
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    COM 150 - Introduction to Computer Programming


    This course offers a basic introduction to computer hardware and software. Elementary programming techniques will be taught using Visual Basic.Net. Emphasis will be on problem solving using the computer.

    1 semester 3 credits
    Fall, Spring
  
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    COM 152 - Computer Programming


    An introduction to the concepts underlying computer science and programming such as: abstraction, analysis, and modularity. Emphasis is on algorithm development, and the use of structured program design techniques in solving problems. Students will develop programs using the syntax and semantics of a higher-level language (e.g. Java). Searching, sorting, recursive algorithms and the concept of objects will be introduced. (Corresponds to ACM CS1)

    Prerequisite: COM 150  or departmental approval.
    1 semester 3 credits
    Spring
  
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    COM 161 - Introduction to Cyber Crime and Computer Security


    CJ 161  , HA 161  

    Cybercrime and cyber security is an introductory course regarding the use of the computer, or information services to further a criminal or deviant objective.  Cybercrime and cyber security will discuss the evolution of information technology and how those advances provided criminal opportunities.  The course will focus on major data crimes and target areas such as Social Media, Personal financial information and medical data. The course will also discuss government response include laws, polices and a basic understanding to secure cyber space, data and information.  The course will also introduce the student to password cracking software and the computer software program EnCase.

    1 semester. 3 credits.
  
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    COM 200 - Computer Science: An Overview


    For students from all disciplines. Topics include: computer organization, information representation in digital computers, algorithm development and analysis, programming languages, hardware and software systems, computer networks, information security and database concepts; E-commerce, computer graphics and entertainment; social and ethical computer issues.

    1 semester. 3 credits.
    Fall 2015.
  
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    COM 205 - Multimedia Applications


    In this course students will be introduced to multimedia principles and technologies. Topics will include effectively representing, processing and retrieving multimedia data such as text, graphics, sound, music, images and video. Students will use the Internet, design and edit an Internet home page, and create a multimedia presentation. Various multimedia tools and techniques will be explored.

    Prerequisite: COM 141  or equivalent.
    1 semester 3 credits
    Fall
  
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    COM 210 - Algorithms and Data Structures


    This course explores specific classes of problems and their solutions. Fundamental questions concerning computational complexity, data storage and access, data encapsulation using objects, space/time bounds, optimal algorithms and data structures including lists, queues, and trees, are addressed. Algorithms for important classes of problems such as searching, sorting, and pattern-matching will be designed, implemented and tested in a laboratory environment. (Corresponds to ACM CS2.)

    Prerequisites: COM 152  and MAT 203 , each with minimum of C-, or departmental approval.
    1 semester. 3 credits.
    Spring 2016.
  
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    COM 220 - Mobile Applications


    This course will teach fundamental programming principles with a focus on mobile application development for iOS and Android platforms. Students will be introduced to the requirements and methodologies necessary for developing dedicated and client-server applications that target smart phones, tablet computers, and other mobile devices. Students will create applications using specialized development environments.

    Prerequisite: COM 152  
    1 semester 3 credits.
  
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    COM 230 - Software Engineering and Methodology


    This course teaches the techniques for managing and producing large maintainable software systems. Topics include cost estimating, requirement specification, design methodologies, implementation and integration, verification and documentation techniques. Students will utilize current automated software engineering tools to apply the learned concepts and will develop a cost estimate, project management plan, functional specification and detailed design specification of a selected software system.

    Prerequisite: COM 210  or departmental approval.
    1 semester. 3 credits.
    Spring 2016.
  
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    COM 240 - Human Computer Interaction


    This course will present human computer interaction (HCI) from the theoretical and design perspectives. HCI explores the study, design, construction and implementation of human-centric interactive computer systems. Topics will include interfaces, cognitive and social interaction design, human-centered evaluation, techniques for developing effective interfaces, accessibility, application domains and the user experience. Students will gain practical experience by completing a semester long project to demonstrate their mastery of HCI concepts.

    Prerequisite:  COM 150  or COM 152  
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Spring
  
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    COM 249 - Computer Organization and Assembly Language


    This course explores the evolution and physical structure of modern computers, from microcomputers to mainframes: their integrated circuits, components and organization. The concept of a multilayer virtual machine will be explored and programmed using machine language, microcode, operating system interrupts and assembly language. Advanced concepts such as RISC machines, pipelining and parallel computing will be studied. Students will utilize these principles to analyze the design of a current microprocessor.

    Prerequisite: COM 200 , COM 210  (With a grade of C- or better) or departmental approval.
    1 semester 3 credits
    Spring
  
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    COM 250 - Scripting Languages


    The course will offer students an overview of scripting languages. The syntax and semantics of the languages will be discussed. Topics include data types, objects, methods, classes, regular expressions, control structures, input and output. Languages covered may include Java Script, VB Script, PERL, PHP, Python and Ruby as well as other scripting languages. Students will learn the differences between these languages, be able to write, test and debug programs and be able to select the appropriate scripting language for specific task.

    3 credits.
  
  •  

    COM 252 - Advanced C++


    This course will briefly review the basic C++ constructs (program template, I/O, math/assignment and control of flow statements) and then focus on advanced C++ contructs, most of which are not included in Java. Type definitions, reference parameters, pointers, templates, overloading operators, multiple inheritance, and the standard template library will be among the topics discussed in detail. In addition, the procedural paradigm will be reviewed. Students will apply the learned concepts by completing several programming projects.

    Prerequisite: COM 152  or equivalent
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Not offered in SJC Brooklyn. Offered in SJC Long Island when there is sufficient student demand.
  
  •  

    COM 260 - Computer and Information Security


    This course combines the theoretical and practical aspects of securing a computer system. The goal is the design and analysis of secure systems, which incorporate confidentiality, integrity and availability. Topics include threats, risk management, access controls, cryptography and encryption, secure code (especially operating systems, databases, programs, email), network and Internet security including firewalls and VPNs. The legal, ethical and privacy issues of information security are emphasized.

    Prerequisite: COM 200 MAT 203  or departmental approval.
    1 semester 3 credits.
  
  •  

    COM 286 - Business Programming I


    Pending

    3 credits
  
  •  

    COM 288 - Business Systems and Design


    (BUS 288 )

    The design and development of information systems for a business environment. Topics will include analysis of information flow, design of business systems, specifications, equipment selection, and file organization. Detailed steps for each phase of the design will be related to business applications on a full scale computer system.

    Prerequisite: Any introductory computer course.
    1 semester. 3 credits.
    Fall.
  
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    COM 300 - Advanced Algorithms


    This course will present advanced algorithms and problem solving techniques. Topics included will be advanced application of recursion, greedy algorithms, backtracking, dynamic programming, graph connectivity algorithms, computational geometry in three-space, and parsing. The algorithms will be applied to the solution of classic problems in computer science such as the Knight’s Tour, Queens Eight, Soduko puzzles, Shortest Path, Transitive Closure, and the reduction of high computational complexity algorithms.

    Prerequisite: Departmental approval.
    1 semester 1 credit.
    Fall, Spring. Offered when there is a sufficient student demand.
    Course is repeatable, not repeatable in the same academic year.
  
  •  

    COM 304 - Algorithm Design and Analysis


    Review of algorithm basics including growth functions (Big-Oh, Big-Theta and Big-Omega notation), algorithms for searching, sorting (Mergesort, Quicksort, Heap Sort), median order statistic, hashing, priority queues, binary trees (red-black and AVL), dynamic programming, amortized analysis, graph algorithms for shortest path problems, minimum spanning tree, min-cut and max-flow problems and NP completeness.

    COM 210  
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Fall
  
  •  

    COM 310 - Operating Systems


    The emphasis of this course is on the efficient allocation and use of computer resources especially process and memory management, job scheduling, access to hardware and software resources, security and reliability. Examples will be drawn from standard operating systems (e.g. Windows NT, MS-DOS, UNIX). Questions relating to communications (timesharing, networking, concurrency, distributed systems, synchronization, and deadlocks) will be discussed.

    Prerequisite: COM 210  or equivalent with a minimum grade of C-.
    1 semester. 3 credits.
    Spring.
  
  •  

    COM 320 - Programming Languages


    This course presents an overview of the syntax, semantics, and pragmatics of several higher level languages and the distinction between static and dynamic typing. Examples will be drawn from various classes of languages including procedural, declarative, functional, concurrent, visual, and object-oriented. The major applications (eg. artificial intelligence, data processing, scientific/engineering, etc.) will be explored for each type of language. Formal languages and automata, including theories of parsing and language translation will be considered.

    Prerequisite: COM 210  or departmental approval
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Not offered in SJC Brooklyn. Offered in SJC Long Island when there is sufficient student demand.
  
  •  

    COM 330 - Computer Graphics


    This course presents an introduction to computer graphics hardware and software. Topics include: vector and raster graphics, viewports and windows, 2-dimensional and three dimensional modeling, viewpoints, rotations and translation transformations, animation and algorithms for line drawings, clipping and hidden line/surface removal. Students will implement these concepts to develop graphics package using a high level programming language.

    Prerequisite: COM 210  or departmental approval
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Not offered in SJC Brooklyn.
  
  •  

    COM 360 - Computer Communications and Networking


    The Open System Interconnection (OSI) model provides the theoretical basis for the study of computer communications. Topics include the physical transmission of data, communication protocols and architecture, network addressing, services and applications such as file transfer (ftp), telnet, and e-mail. Topologies, design and implementation issues involved in LANs, WANs and internetworking will be explored.

    Prerequisite: COM 210 , with a minimum grade of C-.
    1 semester. 3 credits.
    Fall
  
  •  

    COM 361 - Introduction to Cisco Networking


    This course uses a top-down approach to introduce network applications and application services. The layers of communication in data networks will be explained using network protocol models. Students will design and implement a classless IP addressing scheme for a network. Routers and switches will be used to design and configure a basic Ethernet network, and students will analyze the transport and network layer protocols. Routing protocols, such as RIPv1, RIPv2 and distance vector routing, will be examined and configured. Advanced technologies (voice, video, wireless and security) will also be introduced.

    Prerequisite: COM 360  or departmental approval.
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Spring
  
  •  

    COM 362 - Advanced Cisco Networking


    This course focuses on LAN switching and WAN and wireless networks. Using a layered model approach, students will be taught to troubleshoot problems particularly at layers 1, 2, 3, and 7. They will perform and verify initial switch configuration tasks, and will configure, verify and troubleshoot VLANS, VTP, RSTP, DHCP and DNS operation on a router. They will configure and verify a basic WAN serial connection, a PPP connection between routers and Frame Relay. The impact of applications such as Voice over IP (VoIP) and Video over IP on a network will also be explored.

    Prerequisite: COM 360 , COM 361  or departmental approval.
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Fall
  
  •  

    COM 370 - Advanced Computer Programming


    This course will present advanced programming concepts such as inheritance, interfaces, multitasking, interactive network programming, event handling, GUI generation and stream I/O and the use of these concepts in building programs of significant size. Applications, applets and servlets will be investigated. Students will apply the learned concepts by completeing several programming projects of significant size.

    Prerequisite: COM 152  and COM 210  or their equivalent.
    1 semester 3 credits
    Spring
  
  •  

    COM 380 - Database Systems


    An introduction to the principal functions of a Database Management System (DBMS), physical data organization, relational query languages, and issues of data security and consistency.

    Prerequisite: COM 152  or departmental approval.
    This course is applicable to the liberal arts requirements of the curriculum.
    1 semester. 3 credits.
    Fall
  
  •  

    COM 390 - Advanced Application Programming and Database Systems


    This course covers information systems design and implementation with a focus on database management systems. Students will apply design strategies, system analysis and project management principles along with advanced programming skills to create a full-scale database application. Students will utilize Project Management Software and embedded SQL in a high-level programming language such as Java or Visual Basic.Net.

    Prerequisite: COM 288  and COM 380  
    1 semester. 3 credits.
    Spring
  
  •  

    COM 470 - Directed Studies


    Supervised study of the computer science literature, with the findings documented in a paper of significant depth or implemented in a challenging documented project. The approval of the professor offering the course is required to enroll in this course.

    1 semester 1 or 2 credits.
    Not offered in SJC Brooklyn. Offered in SJC Long Island when there is sufficient demand.
  
  •  

    COM 490 - Current Topics in Computing


    Seminar and directed readings on current topics (such as Neural Networks, Fractals and Image transmission, Distributed Databases, Computer Vision and Robotics, etc.).

    Prerequisite: departmental approval
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Not offered in SJC Brooklyn. Offered in SJC Long Island when there is sufficient student demand.
  
  •  

    COM 498 - Internship in Computer Information Technology


    The internship provides a carefully supervised experience in the use or management of a Computer Information Technology. A minimum of 100 hours will be spent in the academic, business or industrial community. Additional elective courses may be selected from the Business Administration/ Marketing and/or Accounting with Departmental approval.

    Prerequisites: departmental approval.
    Repeatable
    2 or 3 credits.
  
  •  

    COM 499 - Internship in Computer Science


    The internship in Mathematics/Computer Science is designed to provide the student with a carefully supervised “hands-on” experience in a particular area (eg. graphics, database management, systems analysis and design, software development, etc.). A minimum of 100 hours will be spent under the supervision of a member of the business-industrial community, acting in conjunction with a designated faculty member.

    Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Mathematics/Computer Science major with departmental permission
    2-3 credits
    Not offered in SJC Brooklyn.
    repeatable.

Criminal Justice

  
  •  

    CJ 158 - Criminal Justice Administration


    An overview of the history, structure and function of the police, prosecutor, judicial and correctional organizations, and their interrelatedness. Through readings and an examination of Supreme Court cases, policy issues such as sufficient evidence, use of discretion and legal concerns will be discussed.

    1 semester 3 credits.
    Fall and Spring
  
  •  

    CJ 161 - Introduction to Cyber Crime and Computer Security


    COM 161 , HA 161  

    Cybercrime and cyber security is an introductory course regarding the use of the computer, or information services to further a criminal or deviant objective.  Cybercrime and cyber security will discuss the evolution of information technology and how those advances provided criminal opportunities.  The course will focus on major data crimes and target areas such as Social Media, Personal financial information and medical data. The course will also discuss government response include laws, polices and a basic understanding to secure cyber space, data and information.  The course will also introduce the student to password cracking software and the computer software program EnCase.

    1 semester. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    CJ 215 - Comparative Criminal Justice Systems


    This course will examine international crime problems such as terrorism, organized crime, human trafficking and drug trafficking, and global mechanisms of justice to address them. Sources of international crime data will be compared. The course will explore diverse ways in which selected international criminal justice systems are structured and implemented around the world to address crime. In order to understand a comparative perspective, the social, cultural, political, historical, and religious factors shaping different systems of justice will be examined. Four worldwide philosophies or legal traditions will be examined including: common, civil, socialist and sacred. A comparison of crime prevention techniques, as well as processes of police, courts, and methods of dealing with convicted felons in diverse nations will be undertaken.

    1 semester. 3 credits.
    Spring.
  
  •  

    CJ 244 - Corrections


    (FORMERLY SOC 244)

    An investigation into the various punitive and rehabilitative philosophies and practices employed by the correctional field in dealing with crime and criminality. Topics include: history of corrections, theories of punishment, death penalty, sentencing, effectiveness of rehabilitation, community supervision, and restorative alternatives.

    Prerequisite: CJ 158  
    This course is applicable to the liberal arts requirements of the curriculum
    1 semester. 3 credits.
    Spring
  
  •  

    CJ 245 - Community Correctional Alternatives


    This course will explore the historical development of probation and parole in the United States as well as current treatment philosophies, and strategies for supervision. It will focus on the relationship between prisons and the community and community- based correctional alternatives. Topics such as boot camps, electronic monitoring, drug courts, halfway houses, and intensive supervision will be explored with an emphasis on evaluating the empirical effectiveness of these alternatives. Speakers, field visit.

    Prerequisite: CJ 158  
    1 semester. 3 credits.
    Alternating Spring Semesters.
  
  •  

    CJ 246 - Restorative Justice


    Restorative Justice presents a new paradigm of community justice focusing on the three parties involved in crime: the offender, victim, and community. Crime is seen as an injury to people and the community, and thus the focus of justice shifts to repairing those injuries, with all parties participating in the outcome: vindication of the victim, opportunities of accountability and rehabilitation of the offender, and peace and public order for the community. Contrasts between the Restorative Justice Approach and the traditional retributive response to crime will be undertaken. Topics will include: mediation, victim-offender reconciliation, family group conferencing, community service, and offender reintegration. Films, speaker.

    Prerequisite: CJ 158  
    1 semester. 3 credits.
    Alternating Fall Semesters.
  
  •  

    CJ 247 - Correctional Rehabilitation


    Correctional Rehabilitation

    This course will examine innovative rehabilitation methods and programs from prevention, to correctional practice, to post-release. Students will be provided with knowledge about evidence-based practices and policies and their underlying theoretical frameworks. Topics will include: Risk and Need assessment, Gender specific Treatment Programs, Substance Abuse programs, etc.

    Prerequisite: CJ 158  
    1 semester. 3 credits.
    Alternating Spring Semesters.
  
  •  

    CJ 248 - Women and Crime


    The focus of this course is on women in the criminal justice system as victims, offenders, and professionals. Relevant theories (such as a discussion of the feminist criminological perspective), policies, and empirical studies, as well as the historical, socio-political, and cultural forces that gave rise to them will be examined. Topics may include: domestic violence and women who kill, women’s trajectory into crime, runaways, drug use, girl gangs, female police officers, and mothers behind bars. Films, speakers.

    Prerequisite: CJ 158  
    1 semester. 3 credits.
    Alternating Fall Semesters.
  
  •  

    CJ 255 - Court and Civil Liberties


    This course will examine courts within the framework of the criminal justice and political system. Special attention will be paid to the interaction of political and judicial processes. The establishment and role of the Supreme Court and the US Circuit Courts, the Federal
    Judiciary Act, selection of judges and role of judges in courts, judicial review, state court systems, and civil liberties.






     

    CJ 158  
    1 semester 3 credits.
  
  •  

    CJ 257 - Juvenile Justice


    A study of the history and current philosophy and practice of the juvenile justice system, and the social, economic and political forces which have brought it to its present state. Students will examine the current levels and trends of juvenile delinquency and violence along with juvenile justice responses to them. Current issues such as transfer of juveniles to adult court, New York State PINS law, and Restorative Justice will be included.

    1 semester. 3 credits.
    Fall
  
  •  

    CJ 260 - Criminal Justice Ethics


    The entire conduct of the administrators of justice rests on the obligation to “establish justice and insure domestic tranquility.” The difficult choices to arrest, to prosecute, to impose punishment often cause public anguish.
    These choices must be founded on moral grounds. The course will explore the historical evolution of justice and ethical thought in Western philosophy by introducing students to four major ethical frameworks: J.S. Mill -Utilitarianism,
    Kant- Deontology, Aristotle- Virtue, and Nietzsche- Good and Evil. Since a civil society rests on ethics, it is ethical principles which must guide the whole system of law. Students will also be presented with situational ethical
    dilemma probable for the criminal justice practitioner whether working in policing, courts or corrections. Case studies and current events will be utilized.




     

    CJ 158  
    1 semester 3 credits.
  
  •  

    CJ 266 - Law Enforcement and Policing


    An examination of the evolution of public policing as an institution of social control, law enforcement policy and procedure, the organizational and administrative aspects of law enforcement, the role that police play in addressing crime as a social problem, the formation of police values and subculture, police discretion, and an understanding of the critical issues and challenges facing crime control today.

    Prerequisite: CJ 158  
    1 semester. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    CJ 270 - Criminalistics and Crime Scene Investigation


    An introduction to modern methods used in detecting, investigation, and solving crimes.  The practical analysis of evidence in a criminal investigation laboratory is covered.  Topics include:  photography, fingerprints, and other impressions, ballistics, documents, and handwriting, glass, and hair, drug analysis, and lie detection.

    This course is applicable to the liberal arts requirements of the curriculum
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Spring
  
  •  

    CJ 271 - Computer Application and Cyber Crime


    This course examines basic computer technology, its evolution, and its application to the field of crime prevention and detection, apprehension and other applications within the criminal justice system. The course will also discuss evolving and emerging crime trends involving computers, computer technology, and crimes of information such as identity theft. Relevant theories to explain crime trends will be covered, including Routine Activity, Environmental Criminology and others.

    Prerequisite: CJ 158  and SOC 243  
    Not offered in the evening or on Saturday.
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Fall
  
  •  

    CJ 272 - Geographical Informatory Systems


    This course will introduce the student to the historical evolution of mapping, and geography in the criminal justice system and then discuss the uses and applications of geographic information systems (GIS) in crime analysis, deployment of resources in the criminal justice system, and the uses of GIS in managing offender populations. Students will also have an introduction to the major GISS applications used in crime analysis Arch Info and Pitney Bowe Map Info.

    Prerequisite:  
    Not offered in the evening or on Saturday.
    1 semester 3 credits.
    Spring
  
  •  

    CJ 273 - Crime Analysis and Policy


    This course is an overview of policy implementation and effectiveness in the criminal justice system. Policies and the short and long term impact on the various components of the criminal justice system will be evaluated. Contemporary topics such as the impact of drug enforcement policies, crime prevention, and alternative responses to crime will be discussed.

    Prerequisite: CJ 158  
    1 semester. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    CJ 277 - Criminal Procedure


    An examination of significant Supreme Court decisions, which define the parameters of acceptable police conduct and individual rights in their interaction with the police and criminal courts. An exploration of the unique issues relating to New York State-specific criminal procedure laws, understanding of crime, law and procedure, coverage of the Bill of Rights and the Constitutional limits of law, which is essential in dealing with the criminal justice population.

    Prerequisite: CJ 158  
    1 semester. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    CJ 278 - Criminal Law


    This course offers students an exposure to the basic principles, theories, and doctrine of criminal law in the United States. Some New York law will also be studied. It will include both historical and contemporary judicial thinking and legal reasoning. The course will consider how criminal law is actually administered in the real world and the impact of politics, race, class, and gender on these procedures. Controversial issues will be explored.

    Prerequisite: CJ 158  
    1 semester. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    CJ 288 - Race, Class and Gender in Criminal Justice


    This course will examine the role of race, class, and gender in the criminal justice, with close attention paid to questions of racial profiling, mass incarceration, and the question of discrimination in criminal justice. The course also examines unique issues raised by race, class, and gender when analyzed in relationship to crime and the criminal justice system. The course comprises various reading materials that will allow critical assessment of issues related to the major issues regarding race, class, gender, and crime. You will be responsible for dissecting these readings, and for engaging in online discussions where these readings are analyzed. The course also includes online team projects focused on specific topics related to race, class, and gender in the criminal justice system. There will be weekly expectations for online discussion (usually tied directly to the readings) and some supplemental readings only available through the course site.

    1 semester. 3 credits.
  
  •  

    CJ 324 - Research Methods in Criminal Justice


    A fundamental understanding of research design and data analysis in criminology and Criminal Justice. The course will examine quantitative and qualitative research methods (experimental design, quasi-experimental design, surveys, field research, secondary data analysis), types of data and measurement, probability, and sampling techniques.

    Prerequisite: CJ 158 . Majors Only.
    This course is applicable to the liberal arts requirements of the curriculum.
    1 semester. 3 credits.
    Fall and Spring.
 

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